by Pavan Srinath

In the few months that Bangalore does not get much rainfall, temperature is the most interesting (and useful) thing to look at. I take a quick look at how the temperature is varying across the city, thanks to five Citizen Weather Network stations that regularly report data.

Visually representing the data often throws up insights far better than conventional statistical analysis, and the same is true here.

Looking at the past 10 days of weather in Bangalore, it is immediately apparent that most of them follow trends similar to each other. With variation of less than 1°C, at least four out of five stations are quite similar to each other in both maximum and minimum daily temperatures.

KnowYourClimate-Feb2015Temperature-CitizenWeatherNetwork

Two outliers stand out. For at least the 10 day period in February, Electronics City’s maximum temperature was consistently and significantly lower than the remaining 4 locations in Bangalore. On February 19, Electronics City recorded a maximum of 35.7 °C, a full 2.5 °C higher than all other locations in town.

Coming to minimum temperatures, GKVK, the agricultural univeristy campus north of town, consistently recorded lower temperatures than the rest of the locations. On February 23, the minimum temperature was 13.7 °C, a full 4 °C lower all other areas.

As the Citizen Weather Network grows, we hope to understand the spatial variation in temperature across the city much better. With more data, we may even be able to attribute causes to temperature variation. We will also be able to tell which temperature effects persist through the year, and perhaps quantify heat island effects on the city of Bangalore.

Pavan Srinath is a weather enthusiast at Know Your Climate, and tweets at @zeusisdead.

Temperature data used for the chart can be downloaded here.