Tag: Pavan Srinath (page 1 of 3)

Bangalore’s temperature outliers in February 2015

by Pavan Srinath

In the few months that Bangalore does not get much rainfall, temperature is the most interesting (and useful) thing to look at. I take a quick look at how the temperature is varying across the city, thanks to five Citizen Weather Network stations that regularly report data.

Visually representing the data often throws up insights far better than conventional statistical analysis, and the same is true here.

Looking at the past 10 days of weather in Bangalore, it is immediately apparent that most of them follow trends similar to each other. With variation of less than 1°C, at least four out of five stations are quite similar to each other in both maximum and minimum daily temperatures.

KnowYourClimate-Feb2015Temperature-CitizenWeatherNetwork

Two outliers stand out. For at least the 10 day period in February, Electronics City’s maximum temperature was consistently and significantly lower than the remaining 4 locations in Bangalore. On February 19, Electronics City recorded a maximum of 35.7 °C, a full 2.5 °C higher than all other locations in town.

Coming to minimum temperatures, GKVK, the agricultural univeristy campus north of town, consistently recorded lower temperatures than the rest of the locations. On February 23, the minimum temperature was 13.7 °C, a full 4 °C lower all other areas.

As the Citizen Weather Network grows, we hope to understand the spatial variation in temperature across the city much better. With more data, we may even be able to attribute causes to temperature variation. We will also be able to tell which temperature effects persist through the year, and perhaps quantify heat island effects on the city of Bangalore.

Pavan Srinath is a weather enthusiast at Know Your Climate, and tweets at @zeusisdead.

Temperature data used for the chart can be downloaded here.

In Vijayavani: ಟೆರೆಸ್ ಮೇಲೇ ನೋಡಿ ಸಿಟಿ ಹವಾ

The Citizen Weather Network and Know Your Climate are featured in the Kannada Daily Vijayavani today, by Balachandra Kanyadi.

Read the full article online: ಟೆರೆಸ್ ಮೇಲೇ ನೋಡಿ ಸಿಟಿ ಹವಾ // See the city’s weather on your terrace.

CitizenWeatherNetwork_Vijayavani1_Feb25_2015

In New Indian Express: Citizen Weather Network

The Citizen Weather Network and Know Your Climate is featured by Ashwini M Sripad in The New Indian Express today:

The project started with two stations, and now the number has gone up to seven. Five more are in the making. The idea is to have at least 30 to 40 such stations across the city.

“It is a continuous process. We need to capture real-time data for a complete year, covering summer, the rainy season and winter. We need to repeat it for some years so that we can compare the data. We get fresh insights into our climate over time,” he said.

The group is planning to link the data to Weather Underground (www.wunderground.com), which provides real-time weather information on the Internet. “They also have a mobile app through which messages can be sent to users,” he said.

Small stations could be set up at schools where kids could get to see data collection demonstrations, he explained. “There is scope to develop a mobile app showing what is happening in a neighbourhood. For instance, in Bengaluru, when it is raining in one part, the other is dry. If you know micro details, you can plan you day,” he explained.

Ashwini M. Sripad, The New Indian Express, 21 February 2015.

The New Indian Express-Bengaluru, 21 FEBRUARY 2015

In Citizen Matters: Weather Web around Bangalore

Know Your Climate and the Bangalore Citizen Weather Network is featured in Citizen Matters today.

Two young weather enthusiasts from the city have initiated the Citizen Weather Network that aims to capture real-time weather data from 30 locations in Bengaluru and make it freely available for public view over a web API. With five stations already installed in different parts of the city, they have started tracking Bengaluru’s microclimate. These indigenously developed Automated Weather Stations (AWS) house sensors for recording temperature, pressure, humidity and rainfall. Each weather station costs under Rs 50K.

The initiative, the brainchild of Pavan Srinath, Head of Policy Research at Takshashila Institution in Ulsoor, started in the form of a blog – Know Your Climate. As Srinath puts it, the blog was an attempt to make a serious study on the climate change by analysing the existing data available in the public domain, and placing it before the public in a simpler way. In 2014, Saurabh Chandra, CEO of Razorfish Neev, joined hands with Srinath to bring the idea to fruition.

Srinath says, “We approached Rajeev Jha of Yuktix Technologies to work towards building an indigenous weather station. Jha accepted the challenge and within eight months the first two Automated Weather Stations were ready.” The pilot stations were installed on the rooftop of Srinath’s house in Jayanagar and Saurabh’s house in Hebbal. Each station was developed at a cost of under Rs 50,000, much lower compared to the conventional stations that are built at a cost of Rs 2 lakh.

The modular weather stations are installed with sensors for measuring four factors – temperature, pressure, humidity and rainfall. While temperature, pressure and humidity sensors are housed within a radiation shield, the rain gauge is maintained separately. All these are connected to a main circuit board that logs all the data. The data is updated once in every three minutes which helps gauge the intensity of rain and weather pattern over time.

Jha vouches for the reliability of the data generated using the considerably cheap, but accurate sensors. “The instruments that we use in the station have been chosen after studying the specifications for an Automatic Weather Station published by the Indian Meteorological Department (IMD),” he says.

These sensors collect the sample of the environment every 15 seconds. As many as 12 samples are taken for each transmitted reading. “We provide the data in par with the standards set by the IMD and World Meteorological Organisation. I can assure data accuracy of +/- 0.1 degree,” he affirms.

Read the full article at Citizen Matters

Know Your Climate featured in Economic Times

Know Your Climate and the Citizen Weather Network is featured in Economic Times today in a piece by Krithika Krishnaswamy on how individuals and groups are taking the initiative to make India’s cities smart.

ET2

“Indian school education often focuses on the climate and geography of India and the world, but we never learn enough about how things work in our city or town,” said Pavan Srinath, who runs Know Your Climate, a not-for-profit that was started in 2011 to tell data-driven stories on Bengaluru’s weather and climate.

Know Your Climate has five weather stations up and running — 25 more to come up by the end of this year, to start recording high quality, granular weather data from the city.

Once the data is collected, Know Your Climate aims to build apps that tell people when to commute or when to bring with them an umbrella or a jacket. The group also wants to set up stations on schools in the future, such that students learn geography and climate by understanding the weather in their in own schools. 

Yuktix, a Bengaluru-based startup, has developed these weather stations at Rs 50,000, a fraction of the cost it takes to import the equipment. “The idea is to show government organisations a model for both deploying weather stations and for making data public,” said Srinath. “It is my hope that the India Meteorological Department also modernises and serves the public much better in the coming years.”

[Full Article — Economic Times, Jan 22, 2015]

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